clean eating

The Paleo Isotonic Super Booster

Paleo Isotonic Super Booster

Well with such a boring picture I had to give this an interesting name! This is the ultimate Paleo sports performance drink!

When I first got back into running after having my first two kids I started to drink those awful sugary isotonic drinks, and well I started to learn that they were actually no good for performance and I would often burn out fairly fast. I deecided to switch back to regular water and up my salt intake. This did work well but not well enough. Fast forward 5 years and going strong on the Paleo diet I started to become more familiar with chia seeds and their benefits within sports performance. I also started to become more aware of the roles of carbohydrates, citrus and sea salts aiding in hydration and electrolyte/isotonic balance. That’s when I came up with this little number.

It is super quick to make and will help you blast out a good endurance run or hour and a half of intensive exercise.  This is best consumed about 30 minutes before you do exercise but you can also drink this first thing in the morning as it will hydrate you and help get those adrenals going!

This drink is also ideal for kids – my kids love this because it is nice and fizzy from the bicarbonate of soda! But this drink isn’t just for athletes and kiddies it is great for the elderly and anyone who is suffering from the flu or a stomach bug with symptoms of vomiting and diarrhea.

So what is so great about all of the ingredients in this drink and what do they do?!

  • Carbohydrates from the raw honey will help to replenish your muscle glycogen whilst increasing the intestinal water absorption rate. It also contains fructose, glucose and maltose which all absorb into the bloodstream at different rates thus making it the ultimate energy source for sports performance.
  • The Himalayan pink salt contains 84 minerals and trace elements including the electrolytes sodium, magnesium, potassium & sulfate.
  • The bicarbonate of soda contains sodium chloride which again aids in topping up your electrolytes.
  • The lemon and lime juice is a great substitution for potassium citrate as it contains high levels of both potassium and citric acid. It also chelates calcium which basically means that it stays firmly attached for better absorption.
  • On to my favourite little power houses – chia seeds. Chia seeds are hydrophillic meaning that they love water, so much so in fact that they can hold up to 12 times their weight in water! This again extends your timeframe for hydration. Chia seeds are also hight in omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fibre, protein and antioxidants. These beauties were used by the ancient aztecs and I have never turned back. They fuel you for a good hour or so of exercise.
  • Water… well yes I think we all know what water is good for!

But anyway now onto the actual recipe! Just to let you know these make excellent freeze pops too for the summer!

Preparation Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

400ml filtered cold water
Juice of 1 lime
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1/2 tbsp raw honey (or maple syrup for Vegan substitution)
1/2 tsp Himalayan pink salt
1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tbsp milled or whole chia seeds

Method:

  1. Start by pouring your water, lemon juice & lime juice into a large glass container and stir.
  2. Add in your raw honey and Himalayan pink salt and leave to sit for 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in your bicarbonate of soda and chia seeds and leave to sit for another 10 minutes to allow the chia seeds to absorb the water thoroughly.
  4. Alternatively you can place all of the ingredients except for the bicarbonate of soda into a blender and blend for a couple of minutes before leave to sit the 10 minutes. You can then stir in your bicarbonate of soda at the end before drinking otherwise the gases will build up and you will be likely to have a little explosion on your hands!!!

Paleo Isotonic Super BoosterPaleo Isotonic Super Booster

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Paleo Tangerine Dream Truffle Tart

Paleo Tangerine Dream Truffle Tart

Paleo Tangerine Dream Truffle Tart

So wowee!!! This Paleo, gluten & grain free dessert is extra special! It is constructed of 5 different layers that each compliment each other well – yes 5 whole layers of yumminess; a chocolate macadamia crust, a deceadent & smooth chocolate orange truffle, tangerine salted caramel, vanilla whipped coconut cream & a fresh tangerine sauce.

This dessert is perfect for Valentine’s Day (hint hint fellas) and is the perfect finisher to a big meal, dinner party or even Birthday. A small slice goes a long way and will quash your sugary chocolate cravings, but be warned even though this is classed as a clean treat it does have a high sugar content and so is best consumed in the evening otherwise you will likely have a bit of a sugar crash!

Now the great thing about this dessert is that you don’t need to construct every layer – you can get away with making just the truffle and salted caramel and it will seem more than luxurious. The crust adds a beautiful crunch to the dessert but it certainly isn’t needed so I will leave you to make a choice as to how you want to make this beauty.

This recipe requires you to chill a can of coconut milk (stored upright) in the refridgerator in order to make your whipped coconut cream. This is to allow the creamy solids to separate from the liquid so that your cream will hold it’s form. If you want to you can freeze the tart however I would recommend to only freeze the first 3 layers and then use the other 2 fresh but the whole thing can be frozen if needed. It will take around 6 hours to defrost in the fridge so bare that in mind! The tart will keep refridgerated in an airtight container for upto 1 week.

Anyways I hope that you guys enjoy this as much as I and my family did!

Makes: 8-10 slices

Preparation Time: 40 minutes (plus upto 1 hour chilling time)

Cooking Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients:

For the chocolate base:

100g macadamia nuts
50g 90% chocolate
1/2 cup Sukrin almond flour
2 tbsp coconut sugar
1 tbsp cacao powder
1/4 tsp vanilla powder
1/4 tsp Himalayan pink salt

For the chocolate orange truffle filling:

100g 90% chocolate
50g raw grass-fed butter
1/2 cup coconut milk
1 tbsp raw honey
1 tbsp orange extract
1/4 tsp vanilla powder
Pinch Himalayan pink salt

For the tangerine salted caramel:

75g raw grass-fed butter
3/4 cup coconut sugar
Juice & zest 1 clementine
1/3 cup plus 1 tbsp coconut milk
1 tsp orange extract
1/2 tsp Himalayan pink salt
1/4 tsp vanilla powder

For the coconut whipped cream:

1 tin of coconut milk (chilled overnight)
1/2 tbsp raw honey
1/4 tsp vanilla powder

For the tangerine sauce:

1/2 cup water
1.5 tbsp raw honey
1/4 tsp xanthan gum (can be subbed with 1 tsp tapioca flour dissolved in 2 tsp water)
1/4 tsp vitamin C (optional but helps with the fresh taste)
1 tangerine

Method:

  1. Firstly place your can of coconut milk inside the fridge the night before preparing your tart.
  2. Create your tart crust by combining all of your ingredients for the crust into a food processor and process until it forms a smooth paste like dough.
  3. Lightly grease a 9″ fluted edge loose based pie tin. Pour in your tart crust dough and knuckle in the dough from the centre of the tin outwards and upwards until you form a nice even crust. Chill the crust in the freezer for 20 minutes.
  4. Prepare your chocolate orange truffle by combining all ingredients for your truffle into a heatproof mixing bowl. Place over a bain-marie on a medium heat. Stir frequently until all of the ingredients have melted and the mix becomes glossy and thick. You can make this in a pan but I find that the results are a lot smoother and you run less risk of burning or curdling the mixture using the bain-marie method.
  5. Once the truffle mix is ready remove your base from the freezer, pour in the truffle and smooth around evenly with a spatula. Return to the freezer for around 20 minutes.
  6. Whilst your tart is chilling prepare your tangerine salted caramel by combining all of the ingredients except for the orange extract, salt and vanilla powder into a small heavy based saucepan, give a good stir and place on to a low heat. Bring the mixture to the boil and whisk frequently.
  7. Once the caramel begins boiling leave on until it the mixture begins to reduce into a caramel like consistency. This will take around 5 minutes. Keep whisking frequently to prevent the sugars from burning.
  8. Remove from the heat and whisk in the remaining orange extract, salt and vanilla powder. Set aside and leave to cool for 10 minutes.
  9. Remove your tart from the freezer and pour over your caramel, be sure to give it a good even spread with a spatula and return to the freezer to chill.
  10. Now it is time to make your whipped vanilla coconut cream. Remove the can of coconut milk from the fridge and scoop out as much of the solid coconut cream as possible. Place into a mixing bowl along with the rest of the ingredients and whisk using an electric hand whisk until thick firm peaks can be formed. To check if it is ready you should be able to tip the bowl upside down and it won’t move. It takes about 5 minutes of consistent whisking to get to that stage. Cover and place into the fridge until needed later.
  11. To prepare the tangerine sauce combine all of the ingredients except for the tangerine into a small pan and whisk until evenly distributed. Pllace onto a low heat and bring to the boil until the mixture has thickened. This will take roughly 5 minutes. Be sure to whisk frequently to prevent lumps! Set aside and leave to cool for a couple of minutes.
  12. Next peel your tangerine and blend until the consistency of a smoothie. Pour in the mixture from the pan and blend until smooth. Place into the fridge to chill for 10 minutes.
  13. Your tart can be stored in the freezer for a couple of weeks and will defrost fully in around 6 hours. So if you are freezing be sure to defrost before decorating with the other 2 layers.
  14. To decorate remove the chilled tart and pour out the coconut cream being sure to spread with a spatula until nice and even.
  15. Next drizzle over your fresh chilled orange sauce et voila you have now made your special treat! Feel free to dive in and eat it all or share with a friend or loved one!

Paleo Tangerine Dream Truffle TartPaleo Tangerine Dream Truffle TartPaleo Tangerine Dream Truffle TartPaleo Tangerine Dream Truffle Tart

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If Haribo made Paleo Gummy Foam Chews…

Paleo Raspberry Foam Gummy SweetsPaleo Raspberry Foam Gummy Sweets

So firstly I would just like to apologise for the rubbish photos – I think that they just don’t do these little sweets any justice at all.

As some of you probably already know (especially my Instagram followers) I have been trying to perfect some Paleo licorice. The black aniseed kind but also some raspberry ones too. In the midst of all of this experimenting I managed to create some amazing sweeties – they are reminiscent of  the flavour of a raspberry Chewit but the texture steers toward a foam gummy (think the white bottom part of a Haribo heart) although with a little more chew. I guess a tad like nougat actually.

I couldn’t think of what to call these so you can call them by your own pet name if you’d like. For now they are pretty much just Paleo Raspberry Foam Gummies haha!

Now mine were cut into little bite size pieces but I wish that I had rolled the mix out and cut them into little hearts. It would have been amazing for Valentine’s Day. I think what will be coming soon to you all is a chocolate bar version of this so keep your eyes peeled!

I am yet to be able to afford some grass-fed gelatine so unfortunately I am using the icky sheet stuff for now. But anyways here you go – onto the fun stuff, but just to warn you you will need a handheld electric whisk of somesort and this is very sticky business!

Yields: Roughly 325g

Preparation Time: 30 minutes

Cooking Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

1/2 cup coconut sugar
1/4 cup coconut milk
1/4 cup water
2.5 tbsp coconut oil
1/4 cup freeze dried raspberry powder
1/2 tsp beetroot powder
1/4 tsp malic acid (optional but gives a great sour boost)
Pinch of Himalayan pink salt
6 leaves gelatine
1.5 cups tapioca flour (plus 1/4 cup for dusting)
1/4 tsp xanthan gum

Method:

  1. Firstly soak your leaves of gelatine in some cold water.
  2. In a medium sized pan combine your coconut sugar, coconut milk and water. Place on a high heat and bring to a boil stirring frequently. Boil for 1 minute then reduce the heat and leave on a steady rolling boil for roughly 5-6 minutes until the mixture starts turning into somewhat of a thick syrup.
  3. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in your coconut oil. Mix well until the oil has fully melted and combined into the mixture.
  4. Sift in your raspberry powder and mix well. Then add your beetroot powder, malic acid and Himalayan pink salt. Mix well until fully combined.
  5. Squeeze the water from your gelatine leaves and mix into the hot mixture until fully dissolved.
  6. Now stir in your 1.5 cups of tapioca flour and xanthan gum. Scrape any excess from your spoon and using an electric hand whisk (on it’s lowest speed setting) begin to whisk until smooth. The mixture will begin to become very thick and sticky quite quickly so as soon as it is combine stop whisking. You will want to whizz off as much of the excess from the whisks as possible!
  7. On a work surface sift half of the remaining tapioca flour and scrape out your mixture on top of it. Sieve the remaining half on top. Leave to cool for about 3 minutes.
  8. Divide the mixture into 2″ chunks and roll into 0.5-1cm wide tubular rolls. Cut into 1″ sized pieces and cut off the ends of each of your rolls for a neater mix. You will need to work fairly fast with this mixture as it starts to becomes harder to manipulate when it cools. Repeat the process until all of the mixture is gone. You can knead smaller pieces into larger ones just be sure that they aren’t covered in too much tapioca flour or they will not roll smoothly. If you wish to roll out as one large sheet and using small shape cutters cut into whatever shape you like.
  9. Once all of you mixture has been used up chill in the freezer for 1 hour in an open container. Remove and leave uncovered for 30 minutes. Then you can place an airtight lid on to keep them fresh. Although I haven’t tested to see the quality of these over time I think you can leave these for around 1 week if stored in a cool dry place.
  10. I hope you enjoy them and be inventive! Try different fruit powders or even dip into chocolate!

Paleo Raspberry Foam Gummy SweetsPaleo Raspberry Foam Gummy SweetsPaleo Raspberry Foam Gummy SweetsPaleo Raspberry Foam Gummy Sweets

Paleo Spiced Fruit Bread

Paleo Spiced Fruit Bread

Best served toasted with some raw grass-fed butter!

Christmas is nearing and how can anyone not crave some sweet, spiced and succulent Paleo fruit bread?!

I’ve mentioned before that I never really like bread but I guess that is a little bit of a white lie! This bread is nutritious and delicious – win win!!! Now you might notice that I use a small amount of milled chia seed in my loaves – why? Because it helps to give your bread a ‘bounce’ similar to that of real bread.

I am very lucky to have the wonderful people at Sukrin looking after me by supplying some of their flours to cook with. I used their Almond Flour and Coconut Flour in this recipe. The difference with their flours in comparison to other mainstream ones is that they have a slightly reduced fat content (don’t worry this is done by cold pressing!) which makes them much finer and more malleable –  almost like real flour!

Sukrin Flours

Sukrin coconut, sesame & almond flours.

Makes: 1 small loaf

Preparation Time: 15 minutes

Proving Time: 1 hour

Cooking Time: Roughly 25-30 minutes

Ingredients:

For the yeast mixture:

1 tbsp dried active yeast
50ml nut or coconut milk
50ml cold water
50ml boiling water
3 tbsp coconut sugar

For the bread mixture:

1 cup tapioca flour
1 cup almond flour
1/2 cup coconut flour
1 tbsp milled chia seeds
1/2 tsp Himalayan pink salt
1.5 tbsp baking powder
50g raw grass-fed unsalted butter (coconut oil can be used but will give a different taste)
3 eggs
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tsp apple cider vinegar (with the mother)

For the fruit mixture:

Juice, zest & pulp of 1 medium orange
3/4 cup mixed dried fruit
1/2 tbsp vanilla extract
3 tbsp maple syrup

For the egg wash:

1 egg
1 tbsp coconut sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
Dash of nut milk

Method:

  1. Firstly prepare your yeast mix. In a cup or measuring jug combine your milk, cold water & hot water.
  2. Stir in your yeast and coconut sugar until the coconut sugar begins to dissolve. Leave to stand for around 10 minutes.
  3. In a medium bowl combine all of your fruit mixture ingredients. Stir thoroughly and leave to rest until needed later.
  4. In a large mixing bowl combine your tapioca, almond and coconut flours. Add your milled chia seeds.
  5. Add your salt, baking powder and coconut sugar and stir until evenly distributed. (Sometimes I find it easier to just use a whisk!)
  6. Next melt your butter and add to the mix. Stir in your eggs.
  7. Your yeast mixture should now have doubled in size. Give it a good stir and pour into the flour mixture.
  8. Now add your apple cider vinegar and bicarbonate of soda and mix until your have a nice tacky dough.
  9. Pour in your fruit mixture and mix.
  10. Knead the dough inside your bowl for about 5 minutes until it starts to become really smooth.
  11. Line a small loaf tin (mine is roughly 9″x5″ with greased parchment paper and transfer your dough. Grease your hands with a little coconut oil to prevent the dough from sticking to you and  ‘knuckle’ the dough in until it is nice and even.
  12. Cover with a damp tea towel and leave to proof in a warm place for 1 hour or until doubled in size. This can be inside your oven with the light on or if you’re good at judging temperature pre-heat it for a few minutes with the door open.
  13. Pre-heat your oven to 180 degrees or Gas Mark 4.
  14. Place your bread in the oven.
  15. Whisk together all of your ingredients for your egg wash in a small cup or bowl.
  16. Your bread will be done once it is golden brown on top and has come away from the sides a little. The best way of testing this is to pop a sharp knife into the middle of the bread and if it comes out clean and boiling hot to the touch then it is ready!
  17. Remove from the oven and allow to cool slightly. Remove the baking parchment and place the loaf back into the tin. Spread the egg wash evenly and thickly over the loaf using a pastry brush. This helps to crisp up and sweeten the crust. Don’t leave in the oven for any longer than 5 minutes otherwise you will end up with a burnt loaf! I find that if you leave it to get to a dark brown (verging on burnt look) colour it is perfect and does not in any way taste burnt!
  18. Remove from the oven, tip out of the loaf tin and leave to cool on a wire rack.
  19. Serve toasted with some good old fashioned grass-fed raw butter.

Paleo Spiced Fruit BreadPaleo Spiced Fruit BreadPaleo Spiced Fruit BreadPaleo Spiced Fruit Bread

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Paleo Superfood Pancakes with a Lemon Curd Caramel Sauce… mmmmm

photo 3(55)

I absolutely love lemon curd. I decided yesterday morning that I really fancy some but I couldn’t think what I could eat it with considering I haven’t made any of my Paleo bread. Pancakes are always a perfect treat but I like to get in as much nutrition as possible when making them. These lovelies contain, flax, chia, almond flour, coconut flour & even some maca! These are perfect for a pre-workout or post-workout meal as they are packed full of protein, carbohydrates, and some awesome maca fuel. I always find that any kind of citrus helps with rehydration! Perfect!

Paleo superfood pancakes with lemon curd caramel saucePaleo superfood pancakes with lemon curd caramel sauce

Makes: 8 Pancakes

Preparation Time: 5 minutes

Cooking Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

For the superfood pancakes:

1 large banana
1 tsp vanilla extract (optional but delicious)
1 tbsp coconut sugar
1 tbsp maple syrup
4 eggs
1 cup tapioca flour
1 tbsp maca powder
2 tbsp ground flax seed
2 tbsp almond flour
1 tbsp milled chia seeds
1 tbsp coconut flour
1 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp bicarbonate if soda
25ml almond milk (or 50:50 coconut milk:water)

1.5 tbsp coconut oil to fry these beauties in!

For the lemon curd caramel:

Juice & zest 1 lemon
50g coconut sugar
25g grass-fed raw unsalted butter
1 free-range egg
1 tsp vanilla extract (optional)
2 tbsp coconut milk (or 1 tbsp nut milk)

Roughly chopped roasted almonds (optional topping)

Method:

  1. Mash together your banana, vanilla essence, and coconut sugar in a medium sized mixing bowl.
  2. Whisk in your eggs and maple syrup thoroughly.
  3. Add your maca powder, ground flax, milled chia seeds and flours, mixing until you get a smooth batter.
  4. Add in your baking powder and bicarbonate of soda mixing thoroughly.
  5. Lastly add in your nut milk of choice and whisk until smooth.
  6. Place a medium sized frying pan on a high heat and add your coconut oil.
  7. Once the oil has melted reduce the heat and place 2 generous sized tbsp of the batter into the pan.
  8. Using the back of the spoon shape into a perfect circle!
  9. Once the top of the pancake looks semi firm (should take about 1 minute) flip over and cook for a further minute. The pancake will ‘puff up’ even more and be golden brown when done. If you’re really that sceptical press down with a spatula to make sure that no batter seeps out.
  10. For the lemon curd caramel sauce place all of the ingredients except for the egg & nut milk into a heatproof bowl and place over a bain-marie on a low heat. Whisk infrequently until the mix has melted.
  11. Now whisk your egg and pour into the mix. Whisk frequently to ensure that no lumps are left. Leave to cook for 10 minutes until the sauce is nice and creamy. It should coat the back of a spoon.
  12. Remove from the heat and whisk in your nut milk. Do this gradually as you may require less or more to get to your desired ‘thickness’. This will also depend upon the size of your egg.
  13. Once you have cooked all of your pancakes, stack them high and pour your delicious lemon curd caramel all over mmmmm. You can also top with some roughly chopped roasted nuts. Almonds work really well with this.

Paleo superfood pancakes with lemon curd caramel saucePaleo superfood pancakes with lemon curd caramel saucePaleo superfood pancakes with lemon curd caramel saucePaleo superfood pancakes with lemon curd caramel sauce

Agave nectar – to consume or not to consume on a Paleo diet?!

GOTSA

The great agave nectar debate…

Before I get verbally attacked when I post my reviews on certain products containing agave nectar, I would just like to put out my rationale on the matter of agave and also why I am reviewing products containing agave. I want to inform those of you new to Paleo on the matter as it is an absolute minefield and very confusing to gain a grasp on!

Firstly agave is Paleo Friendly but not Paleo Certified. What is the difference between the two?

Well.  Paleo Friendly products are essentially products that have labeled as being Paleo buuut within a grey area – like say blackstrap molasses, xylitol or dark chocolate. Dark chocolate has been processed, it contains sugar but it still sort of sits within the realms of the Paleo diet. These products can be called ‘Certified Paleo Friendly’ Confusing huh?! It is up to you to make the decision to include these products within your diet or not.

Paleo Certified products fit perfectly within the bounds of a Paleo diet and are not within any grey area. They contain no legumes, grains, dairy, preservatives, or additives.

So agave nectar comes from the agave plant, it’s not a legume, grain, it’s not dairy it’s not a lot of things but it is indeed a plant. The processing is what makes it Paleo Friendly rather than Paleo Certified.

If I am going to consume agave then it’s likely going to be organic so that is why I am focussing on organic agave within this article.

Now that we have got that out of the way let’s go onto the processing of organic agave nectar.

Organic Agave nectar is made by extracting the milky white juice from the ‘pinas’ (a sort of juicy core) of the Agave plant, filtering it (removing any pulp from the extraction process) and then heating it (typically at a low heat) until it turns into a concentrated ‘syrup’. It doesn’t have any enzymes added to it artificially however during the heating process an enzymatic change occurs and the inulin contained within the agave is broken down into approximately 80% fructose and 20% glucose (worst case scenario). So the good news is that it has minimal processing. Don’t forget that bees also go through an enzymatic process when making honey.

But what about the fructose? Doesn’t that lead to obesity?

No, fructose is not the direct cause of obesity, people are. Through and through. If you consume excess amounts of sugar your body will eventually process and store it as fat. All sweeteners should be used minimally and never as part of your everyday regular diet.

Do not forget that when people are consuming fructose and it is leading to obesity it is generally being consumed in the form of high fructose corn syrup soda/fizzy pop drinks and sweets. The calorific intake is way in excess of what you would consume in an agave sweetened product and also most people won’t have a can of pop and not eat anything else either.  I’m sure you can all figure out what an excess in calories can cause. A glass of fruit juice over a glass of say – coke is always going to be better for you.

But back to the fructose. So the positives about fructose are that fructose is very low on the Glycemic Index (somewhere in the late 20s) so it won’t spike your blood sugar like glucose or high fructose corn syrup would and as it is 1.5 times sweeter than regular sugar a lot less needs to be used to reach the desired sweetness. It is also classed as containing some probiotics. It is also a good option for a Vegan sweetener.

The Agave plant does contain saponins and phytochemicals that are great immune boosters but I cannot vouch for how much of these components are kept intact through the processing of the agave.

The negatives about fructose is that it is metabolized by the liver into triglycerides and so stored as fat and in the long term high fructose consumption can lead to inulin resistance and essentially cause diabetes. If you have liver or renal problems then I would avoid agave nectar like the plague. Like any sugar it is high in carbohydrates that will not fuel your body efficiently either.

Now agave is typically somewhere between 50-80% fructose (depending upon how it is processed) and a tablespoon of agave will typically yield 12g fructose per tablespoon. High fructose corn syrup is somewhere between 50-90% fructose depending upon the manufacturer and will yield around 8g-13g fructose per tablespoon. So they’re around the same. But remember before? when I said that agave is 1.5 times sweeter than normal sugar? Well you’re typically going to use less than high fructose corn syrup – a whole 330ml can of coke (in the UK) contains roughly 35g of fructose. A 50g bar of Conscious raw chocolate contains anywhere from 6g to 10g. I think I rest my case in saying that the fructose consumption is going to be fairly low. I myself cannot eat a 50g bar of any chocolate and usually have a square a day if I have a bar in the house. It’s also a good point to note that a whole mango contains 27.5g of fructose – and I dread to think what a whole dried one contains. Now I will agree that a mango contains more antioxidants, vitamins and minerals without a doubt and I would rather eat me some mango than some pure agave nectar.

Can I consume agave if I am pregnant?

I thought I would add this question in here as there has been research to indicate high levels of saponins leading to miscarriage. Consult your doctor or midwife before consumption. Personally I wouldn’t take the risk.

So would I consume agave nectar and allow my children to? being that I am Paleo and all?

No I certainly wouldn’t buy a bottle of agave nectar and use it in my cooking, I prefer raw honey, maple syrup and cocont sugar because they bring flavour to my cooking, agave is relatively flavourless.

Would I consume agave nectar in a product? Yes I would. Would I consume it regularly? No. I don’t believe in consuming any kind of sugar on a regular basis (which can prove to be a hard task being a food blogger) as it is not healthy to do so. Agave I would certainly consume less regularly than the others but this is because my body does not react well to it in large quantities as I suffer from an autoimmune disease that effects my renal function. If I am out and about with my kids and they want some chocolate and there is a little agave in it, yes I am willing to turn a blind eye. If Santa brings us some agave filled treats will I throw them away? No? In my eyes a treat is a treat – it’s something that you consume less regularly than most other items.

What I am trying to say is that ultimately it is your choice what you want to consume responsibly and I am trying to inform you of what products are available on the market at the moment that you can make a choice from. That is the purpose of a review. When I have finished getting my ‘Paleo Product Guide’ section finished I will be rating products as being green, amber and red. Red being something that you should consume rarely and this would fall into that category.

DISCLAIMER: All information within this article has been gathered from multiple sources and all opinions voiced are solely my own. Please always do your own research too 🙂

What is your take on agave and high fructose intake? Will you have the odd sneaky treat? Please feel free to comment below and if there any mistakes within my writing please feel free to voice those too!